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Themes

 

Creator to Consumer in a Digital Age

Theme 1: An Enduring Information Architecture?

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Books and the Internet—competing or complementary media?
• How do books work and what do they do? The book as an information architecture.
• Finding a new place for books in an information environment of hypertext and instant connectivity.
• Bringing books together—the changing role of librarians and the tools of their trade.
Indexing: a dying art, or a newly important one?
• The editor’s craft: from paper to electronic manuscripts.
• Historical perspectives on the evolution of the book—what can we learn from the history of writing and the development of print?
Digital convergence and the blurring of media boundaries.
• Impacts on the book trade—how do the computer, Internet and entertainment industries impact?
Theme 2: New Technologies of the Book

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• New ways of making the old product—print-on-demand or digital print.
eBook reading devices—what kind of future do they have?
• Book-facsimile formats on computers.
• Future rendering formats—towards electronic paper?
• New formats and alternative renderings—the ‘granularity’ of electronic texts.
• The ecommerce-enabled publishing supply chain: B-2-B, B-2-C and now C-2-C (Creator to Consumer).
• Print and e-text convergence—the digitisation of book production.
• The emerging universe of online standards for electronic and printed books—Internet resource discovery, digital rights, rendering, B-2-B e-commerce.
• Digital rights management and digital asset management.
Multilingual publishing processes, human translation and machine translation.
• Electronic archives and digital object identities.
• Libraries, cataloguing, metadata and resource discovery
• Content management, markup languages and interoperability.
eLearning environments.
Bookstores online.
• The IT architecture of epublishing.
Theme 3: Transforming the Book Business

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• Mass markets versus niche markets; long run and short-run publishing.
• From ‘publishing’ to ‘content services’—changing the nature of the book business.
• Multichannel publishing and customisation.
• Content aggregation and ‘repurposing’ content.
• Publishing and book printing in the ‘new economy’.
Book designers—new tools and new roles.
New players in the book supply chain—content aggregators, publishing services providers, digital asset managers and others.
• Words to the world—the globalisation of the book trade.
• Digital supply chain management—the journey of the cultural content, from the creator to the consumer.
• Digital rights management: The electronic future of copyright.
Returns to creators—where will they be?
• The future of trade publishing.
• What happened to the encyclopaedia? Academic and reference publishing in transition.
• University presses, printeries and bookstores—managing content for universities.
Curriculum and course development—the future of educational publishing.
Children’s books and reading—possibilities and opportunities.
Retailing trends—the bookstore of the past meets the bookstore of the future.
Theme 4: Changing the Work of the Writer and the Role of the Reader

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• Readers becoming ‘users’—how is their role changing?
• Learning to write—old and new roles for computers and books in learning.
• Writers finding new ways with words.
• How do we read, and can we read differently? Reading on paper and screen.
• Readers as authors/editors—navigating and recomposing granular electronic texts.
• Electronic barriers and electronic possibilities for disability access to published material.
• Crossing the ‘digital divide’—hybrid print-electronic solutions.
• Books and publishing in the developing world.
• Texts in translation—from the traditional craft to new processes and new markets.
• Agents and rights trading in a time of electronic connectivity.
• The elearner and elearning—what are the possibilities and limitations?
ePublishing ecologies.
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